Appendix to Accessible Wave Energy Resource Atlas: Ireland 2005

Abstract:

Appendix to the Accessible Wave Energy Resource Atlas.

Publication Date: 2005

Organisation: Marine Institute

Author: ESB Interational

Wind Energy Road Map 2011-2050

Abstract:

Development of renewable energy, including both offshore and onshore wind, is central to Irish energy policy.

Publication Date: 2011

Organisation: Sustainable Energy Authority Ireland

Author: Sustainable Energy Authority Ireland

Third Level Education Needs of the Ocean Energy Industry

Abstract:

The island of Ireland faces an economically transformative opportunity in ocean energy generated from waves and tides. The independent SQW report forecasts substantial income and job potential, particularly in the 2020’s when ocean energy technology is likely to reach maturity and to be deployed on a commercial scale. The opportunity will be realised on two planes- enterprise (e.g. development of the supply chain in Ireland to support the industry not only here but elsewhere in Europe) and export (e.g. through interconnectors to the UK and elsewhere).

A key factor in determining Ireland’s success in this challenging industry will be the quality and availability of appropriately skilled graduates from the Universities and the Institutes of Technology and other bodies, notably in engineering. This Paper presents the findings of a review of this issue by the Marine Renewables Industry Association with expert bodies and with those involved in the emerging ocean energy industry. The principal findings were:

  • There is substantial capacity in engineering education on the island
  • The supply of engineers is reasonable at present although shortages are discerned in the key field of electrical engineering and there is concern about the overall numbers entering the profession
  • The opportunities in ocean energy will be modest to 2015 at least but could be very significant in the 2020s
  • Ocean energy will principally require engineers with a robust, core degree in the traditional disciplines of civil, electrical and mechanical engineering.
  • Little value is attached by the ocean energy industry to the various ‘energy engineering’ qualifications increasingly on offer 
  • Providing real experience of working in the tough offshore environment to engineers is a big challenge for ocean energy
  • The industry- and other experts- would like to see a Masters degree programme in ocean energy engineering which draws off the expertise in specific fields of individual colleges and which is designed in conjunction with the industry to the highest international standards
  • The MRIA will work with appropriate bodies to address the issues identified by this Paper.

Publication Date: 2011

Organisation: MRIA

Author: MRIA

Wave Energy Policy Ireland and Denmark study

Abstract:

This paper uses Ireland as a case study due to the size of its resource (up to 21 TWh1 per annum accessible resource according to ESBI (2005) and the extent of ambition behind the stated Government intent to ‘make Ireland a world leader for research, development and deployment of ocean energy technologies (DCENR (formerly DCMNR) 2007).    

Publication Date: 2007

Organisation: Hydraulic and Maritime Research Centre

Author: Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources

Offshore Renewable Energy Development Plan

Abstract:

A framework for the Sustainable Development of Ireland’s Offshore Renewable Energy Resource.

Publication Date: 2014

Organisation: Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources

Author: Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources

MRIA Requirements for Oceanographic Measurements, Data Processing and Modelling

Abstract:

The Marine Institute and INFOMAR (the joint venture between the Marine Institute and the Geological Survey of Ireland which succeeded the Irish National Seabed Survey) have in the past and continue today to perform an excellent job at providing the marine industry with data and measurements. This document is intended to interpret Marine Renewables Industry Requirements and then to decide best how these can be delivered. This may be done by one of the agencies such as the Marine Institute and INFOMAR or a new/existing commercial entity. 

Publication Date: 2009

Organisation: MRIA

Author: MRIA

Cost Benefit Analysis of Government Support Options for Offshore Wind Energy

Abstract:

A comparative analysis of the costs and benefits to the State of implementing three support options for Offshore Wind Energy (OWE) in Irish waters.

Publication Date: 2002

Organisation: Sustainable Energy Authority Ireland

Author: Byrne Ó Cléirigh

Offshore Wind Energy and Industrial Development in the Republic of Ireland

Abstract:

Offshore Wind Energy and Industrial Development in the Republic of Ireland report commissioned by the Sustainable Energy Authority Ireland to support the Government of Ireland and SEAI in analysing and developing targets, programmes and policies in connection with implementation of wind energy in the Republic of Ireland.

This study has examined: 

  • Task A: Key requirements for Ireland to meet potential future targets for the deployment of offshore wind energy. 
  • Task B: Potential opportunities for the development of an industry supplying the wind energy market in Ireland and overseas. 

Publication Date: 2004

Organisation: Sustainable Energy Authority Ireland

Author: Risø National Laboratory

Foreshore Licensing and Leasing for Marine Renewables Projects - MRIA White Paper

Abstract:

Ireland’s offshore renewable energy resources have significant development potential and are considered among the best in the world. The practicably exploitable wave energy resource is estimated at more than 75% of Ireland’s 2006 electricity demand while our tidal resource also has significant potential. The Government’s Energy White Paper (2007) includes targets of 75MW generated from ocean energy sources by 2012 and 500MW by 2020. In order for Ireland to achieve these progressive targets and optimise the socio-economic benefits associated with exploitation of its marine energy resource, it is critical that public and regulatory policy enacts effective delivery mechanisms.

Key to delivery is the implementation of an appropriate Foreshore Licencing and Leasing process. The existing process, currently under review, operates on a ‘first come, first served’ basis which is felt to be inappropriate for appropriate development of the resource in the national interest. In light of the current review, due to be concluded in 2009, MRIA has prepared this Paper to communicate the Industry view on an effective Foreshore Licencing and Leasing process for marine renewable projects. 

 

Publication Date: 2009

Organisation: MRIA

Author: MRIA

Maritime Infrastructure Development Priorities to Support Ireland’s Future Ocean Energy Industry

Abstract:

The past year has seen a turnaround in the fortunes of ocean energy in the Republic of Ireland with the publication in February of the Government’s Ocean Renewable Energy Development Plan (OREDP). The new policy recognised that the growth of ocean energy would require investment in maritime infrastructure - ships and, in particular, port facilities.

Publication Date: December 2014

Organisation: Marine Renewables Industry Association

Author: MRIA

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